Houston Newsmakers - Immigration mess: Is politics making it worse?

Haitian migrants are latest stress test of border

Texas-Mexico Border
Texas-Mexico Border (KPRC-Pixabay)

There have been record numbers of migrants coming to the Texas-Mexico border this year, putting stress on an already strained immigration system.

The latest surge came from thousands of Haitians who came from South American countries hoping to get into the United States. The Haitian plight has been receiving quite a bit of sympathy and pro-Haitian demonstrations, but former Houston City council member Gordon Quan, who is an immigration attorney, says the Haitian status should be based on whether they are coming for economic gain or fear of persecution.

“I think that is why we’re seeing a certain different standard being applied and people being returned or being repatriated back to Haiti,” Quan said. “They don’t meet the criteria in general of refugee as our law defines.”

The Haitian migrant surge is just the latest to impact the Texas-Mexico border. This week on Houston Newsmakers with Khambrel Marshall, the question is what to do to ease the stress and how politics is getting in the way of a solution and much more Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. and here on this Newsmakers EXTRA.

Komen 2019 Race Start (KPRC)

Komen Race for the Cure is back!

After a forced year off because of COVID-19, the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure is back for in person AND virtual participation on October 2nd! Ashley Dedmon is Komen Houston’s community programs manager. After her great-grandmother, grandmother and mother died from breast cancer, she has a special connection with this very special race. “There was a larger community around us that had also been impacted by breast cancer,” she said. “Women, men, family members, care givers and so that was really a safe space for us, that walk, to really help us come together and know that we were not alone.”
After a forced year off because of COVID-19, the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure is back for in person AND virtual participation on October 2nd! Ashley Dedmon is Komen Houston’s community programs manager. After her great-grandmother, grandmother and mother died from breast cancer, she has a special connection with this very special race. “There was a larger community around us that had also been impacted by breast cancer,” she said. “Women, men, family members, care givers and so that was really a safe space for us, that walk, to really help us come together and know that we were not alone.”

Family Cancer History Brings Family Closer to Komen

After a forced year off because of COVID-19, the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure is back for in person AND virtual participation on October 2nd! Ashley Dedmon is Komen Houston’s community programs manager. After her great-grandmother, grandmother and mother died from breast cancer, she has a special connection with this very special race.

“There was a larger community around us that had also been impacted by breast cancer,” she said. “Women, men, family members, care givers and so that was really a safe space for us, that walk, to really help us come together and know that we were not alone.”

See more about the race and Susan G. Komen in this Newsmakers EXTRA.

It’s Hispanic Heritage Month and that’s something celebrated every day by the Institute of Hispanic Culture of Houston. Mayte Sera Weitzman is the president of the organization and says cultural education is a key priority. “I want my kids to love platanitos and to eat our cultural foods. These are the programs we have had for years and this is the reason we’ve got to keep our culture and celebrate it.” More about the many cultures that make up the Hispanic community and how you can get involved.
It’s Hispanic Heritage Month and that’s something celebrated every day by the Institute of Hispanic Culture of Houston. Mayte Sera Weitzman is the president of the organization and says cultural education is a key priority. “I want my kids to love platanitos and to eat our cultural foods. These are the programs we have had for years and this is the reason we’ve got to keep our culture and celebrate it.” More about the many cultures that make up the Hispanic community and how you can get involved.

Committed to Hispanic Understanding and Education

It’s Hispanic Heritage Month and that’s something celebrated every day by the Institute of Hispanic Culture of Houston. Mayte Sera Weitzman is the president of the organization and says cultural education is a key priority.

“I want my kids to love platanitos and to eat our cultural foods. These are the programs we have had for years and this is the reason we’ve got to keep our culture and celebrate it.”

More about the many cultures that make up the Hispanic community and how you can get involved.


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